pretty-period:

KhadijahBrooklyn, NYPhoto Credit: Ann Blake Photography

I get it from my Mama!

pretty-period:

Khadijah
Brooklyn, NY

Photo Credit: Ann Blake Photography

I get it from my Mama!

MALCOLM X’S EULOGY
Eulogy delivered by Ossie Davis at the funeral of Malcolm X Faith Temple Church Of God February 27,1965

"Here - at this final hour, in this quiet place - Harlem has come to bid farewell to one of its brightest hopes -extinguished now, and gone from us forever. For Harlem is where he worked and where he struggled and fought - his home of homes, where his heart was, and where his people are - and it is, therefore, most fitting that we meet once again - in Harlem - to share these last moments with him. For Harlem has ever been gracious to those who have loved her, have fought her, and have defended her honor even to the death.
It is not in the memory of man that this beleaguered, unfortunate, but nonetheless proud community has found a braver, more gallant young champion than this Afro-American who lies before us - unconquered still. I say the word again, as he would want me to : Afro-American - Afro-American Malcolm, who was a master, was most meticulous in his use of words. Nobody knew better than he the power words have over minds of men. Malcolm had stopped being a ‘Negro’ years ago. It had become too small, too puny, too weak a word for him. Malcolm was bigger than that. Malcolm had become an Afro-American and he wanted - so desperately - that we, that all his people, would become Afro-Americans too.
There are those who will consider it their duty, as friends of the Negro people, to tell us to revile him, to flee, even from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times. Many will ask what Harlem finds to honor in this stormy, controversial and bold young captain - and we will smile. Many will say turn away - away from this man, for he is not a man but a demon, a monster, a subverter and an enemy of the black man - and we will smile. They will say that he is of hate - a fanatic, a racist - who can only bring evil to the cause for which you struggle! And we will answer and say to them : Did you ever talk to Brother Malcolm? Did you ever touch him, or have him smile at you? Did you ever really listen to him? Did he ever do a mean thing? Was he ever himself associated with violence or any public disturbance? For if you did you would know him. And if you knew him you would know why we must honor him.
Malcolm was our manhood, our living, black manhood! This was his meaning to his people. And, in honoring him, we honor the best in ourselves. Last year, from Africa, he wrote these words to a friend: ‘My journey’, he says, ‘is almost ended, and I have a much broader scope than when I started out, which I believe will add new life and dimension to our struggle for freedom and honor and dignity in the States. I am writing these things so that you will know for a fact the tremendous sympathy and support we have among the African States for our Human Rights struggle. The main thing is that we keep a United Front wherein our most valuable time and energy will not be wasted fighting each other.’ However we may have differed with him - or with each other about him and his value as a man - let his going from us serve only to bring us together, now.
Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man - but a seed - which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us. And we will know him then for what he was and is - a Prince - our own black shining Prince! - who didn’t hesitate to die, because he loved us so.”

MALCOLM X’S EULOGY

Eulogy delivered by Ossie Davis at the funeral of Malcolm X
Faith Temple Church Of God
February 27,1965

"Here - at this final hour, in this quiet place - Harlem has come to bid farewell to one of its brightest hopes -extinguished now, and gone from us forever. For Harlem is where he worked and where he struggled and fought - his home of homes, where his heart was, and where his people are - and it is, therefore, most fitting that we meet once again - in Harlem - to share these last moments with him. For Harlem has ever been gracious to those who have loved her, have fought her, and have defended her honor even to the death.

It is not in the memory of man that this beleaguered, unfortunate, but nonetheless proud community has found a braver, more gallant young champion than this Afro-American who lies before us - unconquered still. I say the word again, as he would want me to : Afro-American - Afro-American Malcolm, who was a master, was most meticulous in his use of words. Nobody knew better than he the power words have over minds of men. Malcolm had stopped being a ‘Negro’ years ago. It had become too small, too puny, too weak a word for him. Malcolm was bigger than that. Malcolm had become an Afro-American and he wanted - so desperately - that we, that all his people, would become Afro-Americans too.

There are those who will consider it their duty, as friends of the Negro people, to tell us to revile him, to flee, even from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times. Many will ask what Harlem finds to honor in this stormy, controversial and bold young captain - and we will smile. Many will say turn away - away from this man, for he is not a man but a demon, a monster, a subverter and an enemy of the black man - and we will smile. They will say that he is of hate - a fanatic, a racist - who can only bring evil to the cause for which you struggle! And we will answer and say to them : Did you ever talk to Brother Malcolm? Did you ever touch him, or have him smile at you? Did you ever really listen to him? Did he ever do a mean thing? Was he ever himself associated with violence or any public disturbance? For if you did you would know him. And if you knew him you would know why we must honor him.

Malcolm was our manhood, our living, black manhood! This was his meaning to his people. And, in honoring him, we honor the best in ourselves. Last year, from Africa, he wrote these words to a friend: ‘My journey’, he says, ‘is almost ended, and I have a much broader scope than when I started out, which I believe will add new life and dimension to our struggle for freedom and honor and dignity in the States. I am writing these things so that you will know for a fact the tremendous sympathy and support we have among the African States for our Human Rights struggle. The main thing is that we keep a United Front wherein our most valuable time and energy will not be wasted fighting each other.’ However we may have differed with him - or with each other about him and his value as a man - let his going from us serve only to bring us together, now.

Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man - but a seed - which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us. And we will know him then for what he was and is - a Prince - our own black shining Prince! - who didn’t hesitate to die, because he loved us so.”

2dots:

Justin Dingwall : Albus

Albus, a beautiful photography series that explores the aesthetics of Albinism in contrast with the idealized perception of beauty. Thando Hopa, the model is a South African legal prosecutor and now fashion model, uses her new-found fame to negate the taboo surrounding albinism.

"Eternal glory to the fighters for national liberation! Long live independence & African unity! Long live the independent & sovereign Congo!" - Patrice Lumumba (2 July 1925 – 17 January 1961)

"Eternal glory to the fighters for national liberation! Long live independence & African unity! Long live the independent & sovereign Congo!" - Patrice Lumumba (2 July 1925 – 17 January 1961)

The largest slave revolt in U.S. history occurred this day 203 years ago. It started in LaPlace.

http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2014/01/the_largest_slave_revolt_in_us_1.html

The largest slave revolt in United States history occurred on this date 203 years ago. The uprising started in what is now LaPlace in St. John the Baptist Parish in 1811 and rolled eastward, with a goal of reaching New Orleans and possibly banding with other rebels to take the city.

RevoltArt by renowned River Parishes artist Lorraine Gendron depicts the largest slave revolt in United States history. It started in LaPlace and rolled east toward New Orleans before being crushed in Kenner.  

The makeshift army of more than 200 enslaved men came from various parts of the U.S., Africa and Haiti. They were able to organize despite living miles apart on plantations along the German Coast of Louisiana.

They carried mainly farming tools as weapons, however, and were outgunned by a military detachment and local militia organized by farmers. They were stopped near Kenner.

Most of the slaves were killed during the battle. Others were later executed after a trial held at Destrehan Plantation in St. Charles Parish.

An exhibit commemorating the revolt is on permanent display as part of the plantation’s 1811 Slave Revolt Museum and Historical Research and Education Center. And New Orleans historian Leon Waters has created a tour that retraces the steps of the uprising.

Despite the slaves’ failure to reach New Orleans, historians say the uprising succeeded in raising awareness of the cruelty of human bondage and  helped fuel the abolition movement.

Read a detailed article about the 1811 revolt.

MIT PhD Candidate Sues CIA for the Records Surrounding the 1962 Arrest of Nelson Mandela

    [WASHINGTON, DC]  Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) PhD candidate Ryan Shapiro filed a lawsuit this morning against the Central Intelligence Agency over the spy agency’s failure to comply with his Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for records on recently deceased anti-apartheid activist and South African President, Nelson Mandela. Shapiro wants to know why the CIA viewed Mandela as a threat to American security, and what actions the Agency took to thwart Mandela’s efforts to secure racial justice and democracy in South Africa.

    President Obama on Robben Island Prison

    President Obama and the first family solemnly reflect during a visit to Nelson Mandela’s prison cell on Robben Island.  Photograph, Pete Souza.  

    Shapiro, a FOIA specialist, is an historian of the policing of dissent and the political functioning of national security. His pathbreaking FOIA work has already led the FBI to declare his MIT dissertation research a threat to national security. Shapiro also has FOIA requests for records on Mandela in motion with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Defense Intelligence Agency, and the National Security Agency. Shapiro is represented by FOIA specialist attorney Jeffrey Light.

    Two Key Issues Regarding Today’s Filing Against the CIA:

    1) The CIA is widely and credibly believed to have been involved in Mandela’s 1962 arrest that led to his decades-long incarceration. Yet, the Agency has never admitted its role in this affair, and little specific public information exists on the matter. Shapiro’s FOIA efforts will begin to fill this massive hole in public knowledge of U.S. intelligence operations.

    2) Despite longstanding public knowledge of U.S. intelligence assistance to apartheid South Africa in general, and in Mandela’s arrest in particular, much of the U.S. and world press has paid distressingly little attention to these issues. Even in the wake of Mandela’s death, these issues, including the fact that Mandela remained on the U.S. terror watch list until 2008, have for the most part remained ignored or discounted. Shapiro’s efforts will bring much-needed attention to these vital topics, as well as to the U.S. intelligence community’s continued outrageous aversion to transparency.

    According to Shapiro:

    “Though the U.S. intelligence community is long believed to have been involved in Mandela’s arrest, little specific public information exists regarding this involvement. Similarly, though the U.S. intelligence community is long understood to have routinely provided information to the South African regime regarding the anti-apartheid movement, little specific public information exists about these activities either. Further, despite now being universally hailed as a hero and freedom fighter against gross injustice, Mandela was designated a terrorist by the United States government and remained on the U.S. terror watch list until 2008.

    In bringing suit against the CIA to compel compliance with my Freedom of Information Act request, I seek access to records that will begin answering the following questions:

    What was the extent and purpose of the U.S. intelligence community’s surveillance of Nelson Mandela prior to his arrest? What role did the U.S. intelligence community play in Mandela’s arrest and prosecution? What role did the U.S. intelligence community play in the broader effort to surveil and subvert the South African anti-apartheid movement? To what extent, and for what objectives, did the U.S. intelligence community surveil Mandela following his release from prison? To what extent, if any, did the U.S. intelligence community continue providing information regarding Mandela to the apartheid regime following Mandela’s release from prison? What information did the U.S. intelligence community provide American policymakers regarding Mandela and the South African anti-apartheid movement? To what extent, and to what ends, did the U.S. intelligence community surveil the anti-apartheid movement in the United States? How did the United States government come to designate Nelson Mandela a terrorist threat to this country? How did this designation remain unchanged until 2008? And what was the role of the U.S. intelligence community in this designation and the maintenance thereof?”

    FOIA LawsuitYou can read the full text of today’s court filing against the CIAHERE.

    dynamicafrica:

    BEST POSTS OF 2013 #59: NOTABLE AFRICANS: DJAMILA BOUHIRED

    Currently in her late 70s, Algerian nationalist, activist and revolutionary Djamila Bouhired is a freedom fighter best known for her contributions to the fight against French colonial rule in Algeria as a member of the Front de Libération Nationale (FLN).

    Born in 1935 to a middle-class family, Bouhired was educated in French schools. However, the colonial system of education did not have the desired effect on Bouhired as she she joined the anti-colonial revolutionary movement of the FLN working as a student activist and soon began working as a liaison officer and personal assistant to FLN commander Yacef Saadi in Algiers. Her brothers were also involved in the underground struggle.

    Due to her good looks and slightly European appearance, Bouhired was able to seamlessly move around the Algiers and pass through road blocks set up by French authorities, which proved to be a critical asset in the militant operations of the FLN. Bouhired was one of three FLN female bombers depicted in the 1966 film The Battle of Algiers, and was also the subject of Egyptian director Youssef Chahine’s 1958 film Jamila the Algerian.

    During a raid in June 1957, Bouhired was captured, arrested and accused of planting bombs in French restaurants around the capital, Algiers. Although not much is known about her imprisonment, Bouhired has said that both her and her siblings were subjected to torture under French authorities, claiming also that one of her brothers was tortured in front of their mother.

    Bouhired was tried, convicted and sentenced to death by guillotine in July 1957. However, Jacques Vergès, a French lawyer who heard of her case and was against France’s occupation of Algeria waged a public relations campaign that resulted in immense pressure being put on France by international governments and human rights organizations. As a result, Djamila Bouhired was released.

    She would eventually go on to marry Vergès with whom she had two children. The couple also established Révolution africaine, a publication that focused on Pan-Africanism and African nationalism movements.

    Djamila Bouhired currently resides in Algiers and continues to be an active figure in many human rights and feminist politics in the country.

    When you’re 45th in civil liberties, 19th in economic freedom, and #1 in prisoners per capita, I think it’s officially time to stop bragging about being the “freest country on earth”–and maybe time to start thinking about how to rebuild that image.